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Beautiful Dog and Smells Good too

September 17th, 2008 at 11:19 am

Wish I had a picture of him to post.

Sugar is a golden ret mix, medium 40 lb, all white long haired dog. High energy, fairly needy.

Adopted from the shelter he has helped my kids get to know dogs better and relieve some fear. But he is a little skittish, doesn't like surprise touches in the tail area and beware of getting near his face when he's eating or has a bone.

And sensitive to brushing. Now I could rename my biz to 'Hair of the Dog', but BLEH. I am able to brush him lightly as often as I can, but certainly not as thoroughly as he needs. Can you say 'mats'?

After a number of appointments with the PetCo groomer (who wanted to do the grooming at another store where they could tranquilize him), we moved to a private groomer (who was good but kept increasing the fee because of the work brushing, clipping and drying him, the latter which took over an hour alone).

Finally on to the mobile groomer. OK. So far two appointments. He has advised me:

'Do it more frequently than 9 weeks to make it easier on the dog.'

Cost is currently $55/pop.

I don't even get my OWN hair done that often.

I am punting this to my husband who connected with this pup in the first place. Yes, I have grown to love Sugar, but am not willing to write so many checks.

5 Responses to “Beautiful Dog and Smells Good too”

  1. scfr Says:

    Since each dog is it's own woderful unique self, I do not know if this will be at all helpful, but this is what helps me with grooming my "I do NOT want to be brushed" dog:

    My dog ADORES Greenies. I go and get the grooming tools (brushes and nail filer), then I go and get a Greenie. I hold the Greenie up so he can see it but so it's out of his reach, and slowly say "xxx, Keep your eye on the prize." I then set the Greenie up on a counter, where he can still see it but not get to it.

    I tell my dog to sit, then I slowly set the grooming tools down on the floor. (Moving slowly and making sure the dog can see everything that is coming is very important.) Then I start to brush. If he gets antsy and moves away, I patiently repeat "Keep your eye on the prize" ask him to sit, and start again.

    When I'm done, of course he gets the Greenie, which results in much happy dancing around.

    I started out doing this just a bit of brushing and nail filing at a time, and gradually built up the time. He now knows exactly what "Keep your eye on the prize" means, looks forward to grooming sessions, and tries mightily to hold still for me.

    Good luck with Sugar!

  2. pretty cheap jewelry Says:

    Thx for the tips, maybe a New Year's Resolution will be to increase the home grooming (I keep a brush within reach in the busy kitchen area to grab whenever I can get a few strokes in).

    Yes, he will do most anything for a pupperoni! And is very very good at 'sit'.

    If nothing else I brush him to keep the mass quantities of shedding down so as to prolong time between vacuums to more than a day. BLEH Smile

  3. sillyoleme Says:

    Our pup has shorter hair, so no real brushing is needed on a regular basis. He loves any kind of attention though, so I'm sure he wouldn't mind anyway. The only problem we have is nail clipping. His paws & nails are so big and thick, and they are black so I always get scared I'm going to cut them too short!

    The vet tech told me the other day that the more you cut them, the slower they grow. That's opposite of what I've heard about human nails, so it surprised me.

  4. gamecock43 Says:

    can you pay the kids to do it?

  5. fern Says:

    I don't blame you for not wanting to spend that kind of money simply on brushing the dog's fur, but there's got to be a way you can leanr to do it yourself and desensitize the dog and ideally have him enjoy it, as he should, if you're gentle.

    I think scfr had a great idea. Get him to learn to associate rewards like food with a bout of fur brushing.

    As for the dog not liking it when you go near him when he has a bone, i wouldn't blame him for that, he is, after all, an animal that's acting on instinct.

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